Your Web Company Points to You for Not Updating

Soft costs of a hacked website

You may not get a direct bill for soft costs, but they add up. That’s why we’ll spend most of our time here.

Here’s a breakdown of the soft costs Owner/Partner/Shareholder Email Lists of a hacked website.

Data Loss

Owner/Partner/Shareholder Email Lists

Let’s start with a cost that waffles between a hard and a soft cost.

Yes, there’s a neat bill for data recovery, but you can’t put a price on the data itself – and its loss can be catastrophic.

The New York Times shares the story of small toy business Rokenbok,

which fell victim to ransomware malware. Hackers held all of Rokenbok’s data for ransom. Rather than pay the ransom, the seven-person team took four days to reconstruct the system. And this wasn’t the first time the company had been hacked.

The article, by Constance Gustke, states:

 

While data loss alone is damaging, your data and your customer data can be stolen for malicious purposes causing exponentially more damage. The companies in this Information is Beautiful interactive graphic on the world’s biggest data breaches can attest to that.

Data loss, and any other ramification of website hacking, lead to the next soft cost.

Loss of Internal and External Confidence

Not only can you lose the trust of current and potential customers from a hacked website; there’s also a lot of finger-pointing.

your software, you point to the hosting provider because you thought they took care of the problem, the hosting provider says someone at your company didn’t change the password, and on and on it goes.

“This is often incorrectly placed blame,” WhatArmy Founder Chris Merrill says, “It’s on the business owner to put a risk management plan in place. It’s just like insuring a car.”

Loss of confidence leads to our next cost.

Disruption and Stress

 

 

They’re stressed, you’re stressed and that ripples throughout the organization.

We often discover malware on a site during setup or when a client comes to us for a web project.

 

For example, a new client signed up with us to have some content added for an upcoming promotion. Chad explains:

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.